Texas Statehood United States Liberty Half-Dime Sterling Silver Money Clip, Circa 1845

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This authentic 1845 Seated Liberty Half-Dime has been mounted by a master silversmith to create a beautiful commemorative Texas statehood silver money clip. Custom designed by The Great Republic, each piece is hand numbered in an edition of 100 total pieces and then mounted onto a Texas star, that is then superimposed onto an outline of the State of Texas. Magnificent!

The History: During the first third of the 19th century, the average American saw few of his country’s gold or silver coins, if any at all. Strangely enough, in relation to the size of the rapidly expanding nation, not many coins were made.

One of the earliest coins of the new republic was the Liberty Half-Dime -- later becoming the Seated Liberty Half-Dime. Initially minted in 1837 -- the coin involved to become an extremely attractive piece of silver.

In 1840, Robert Ball Hughes made the first of many modifications to the half-dime. He added extra drapery behind Liberty’s elbow, to compliment the 13 stars that surround the great lady. Thirteen years later, to combat widespread melting of silver coins following the California Gold Rush, Chief Engraver James B. Longacre added arrowheads on either side of the date, denoting a slight weight reduction. The Stars obverse design, without arrows, resumed in 1856 and continued until 1860, when the Legend Obverse design debuted. The last changes were made in 1859, when engraver Anthony Paquet slimmed Liberty’s arms, reduced the size of her cap and enlarged her head.

By the time Stars Obverse half dimes ended their run, America stood on the brink of civil war. The coming conflagration would see many of the little coins disappear into hoards and melting pots. Production ended in 1859 to make way for the new Legend Obverse design with the fanciful “cereal wreath” on the reverse. However, Christian Gobrecht’s Seated Liberty lived on until Congress ended the denomination 24 years later, with legislation that history would call the “Crime of `73.”




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